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    After 70 long years, a new species of pitviper emerges from Arunachal Pradesh

    If you were to play a game of hide-and-seek with the recently discovered pitviper, Trimeresurus arunachalensis, there's no questioning who would win! It's russet tones match the forest floor so well that you could walk right past it several times and be none the wiser. It is no surprise that researchers have described this elusive, yet memorable, species from...

    • 12 hrs ago
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    The micro effects of Fasting and Feasting

    There is a lot more to fasting and feasting than the hunger and contentment that comes with it. Our cells have to continuously and dynamically turn a few genes 'ON' and 'OFF' and regulate the production of specific proteins, to cope with changes in the glucose levels. It is not often that we realise that our cells do it almost every day when we go through a cycle of Feeding, fasting...

    • 4 days ago
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    India's river catchments are drying up, too many too soon

    Study shows that more than half of river catchments are struggling to get back in shape due to human activities and climate change. All the great civilisations in the history of humankind have flourished alongside riverbanks. However, in recent years, India's booming economy, rapid urbanisation and industrialisation have disturbed the ecology of our rivers. Divvying up the river...

    • 5 days ago
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    Word on the Vine: New species of vine snake discovered in India

    Almost a decade ago, in 2009, two herpetologists spotted a snake crossing the road in the Similipal Biosphere Reserve, Odisha. Although Prof Sushil K. Dutta and Dr Pratyush Mohapatra could tell that they were seeing this snake for the first time in Odisha, little did they know that they were on the verge of a discovery. "We thought it was another subspecies of the Common vine...

    • 5 days ago
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    Whose 'right' is it in the Sundarbans?

    Bureaucracy and political interests hinder the implementation of the Forest Rights Act, finds study A quarter of India's population, including indigenous tribes or Adivasis, have for centuries lived in and around forests, depending on it for their livelihood. When the British enacted laws to bring forests under the ownership of the state, these communities lost their homes and livelihoods. In 2006,...

    • 7 days ago
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    Two species of diatoms discovered in Sikkim

    What do you get when a trip to Sikkim does not follow the plan, thanks to hectic schedule and unfavourable weather? It's a frustration for many; a "Eureka!" moment for some! The latter is what happened when Dr Balasubramanian Karthick and his team of researchers went to Sikkim last year. A trip, meant to meet up with fellow scientists, ended with the discovery of two new species of...

    • a week ago
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    Here is a Jumping Spider that Weaves an Orb-Web to Rest!

    A jumping spider is a master hunter, with large eyes and ability to leap vast distances. They belong to the family Salticidae and are one of the most abundant species on the planet. Their cute front eyes, colours, and elaborate patterns can make even an arachnophobe reevaluate their fears. However, these traits, along with their ability to jump vast distances to capture their prey, makes...

    • 2 weeks ago
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    IISc Develops India's first e-mode Gallium-Nitride Power Transistor

    All electronic devices that we use today have components made of semiconductors, mostly silicon. In recent years, gallium nitride (GaN), another semiconductor, is making its way into electronics as it is better suited for high power and high-frequency applications. Since GaN technology is still evolving, and it is less expensive to set up a foundry for manufacturing, it is...

    • 2 weeks ago
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    Researchers identify key genes that help rice adapt to water scarcity

    Very soon, the shortage of water and population explosion in the world may cost you your plate of biryani, and for many, their livelihood. Rice, a staple food for over 3.5 billion people in the world, is facing a threat in recent years due to the scarcity of water across the globe. Traditionally, rice is a water-intensive crop, grown by puddling water in the fields. The...

    • 2 weeks ago
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    Indian tigers more stressed than their Russian cousins, shows study

    With its bright orange coat and dark stripes, the majestic tiger strikes fear and wonder in the hearts of people, and is thus the protagonist of numerous literary works. This big cat, which is now endangered, once roamed across much of south, south-east and central Asia. Today, there are two recognised subspecies of tigers, and nine geographical populations found in a few wild...

    • 2 weeks ago

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